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FCC Chairman Ajit Pai Appoints GeoLinks’ CEO Skyler Ditchfield to the BDAC Disaster Response and Recovery Working Group

The panel is tasked with developing best practices to improve broadband outage response caused by local, state, and national disasters

CAMARILLO, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–On Thursday, November 1, 2018, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman, Ajit Pai, announced GeoLinks’ CEO Skyler Ditchfield’s appointment to the FCC’s Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC) Disaster Response and Recovery Working Group.

As stated in the FCC’s formal news release, The Disaster Response and Recovery Working Group is tasked with recommending measures to improve the resiliency of broadband infrastructure before disasters occur, as well as actions that can be taken to more quickly restore broadband infrastructure following a disaster. The Chairman has also charged the working group with developing best practices for coordination among wireless providers, backhaul providers, and power companies during and after a disaster.

“Broadband communications have become essential to the delivery of life-saving information in a disaster,” Chairman Pai said. “It’s critical to public safety that our broadband networks are as resilient as possible to prevent outages in a disaster and also can be restored as quickly as possible when an outage occurs.”

Led by Chair Red Grasso, FirstNet State Point of Contact for the North Carolina Department of Information Technology, and Vice-Chair Jonathan Adelstein, President & Chief Executive Officer of the Wireless Infrastructure Association, Ditchfield is the only California-based representative, and the only fixed wireless broadband provider in the group.

“I am both honored and excited to be part of this working group,” said GeoLinks’ co-founder and CEO Skyler Ditchfield. “Throughout the past few fire seasons in California, my team and I have gained extensive experience in recovering from and restoring connectivity during natural disasters. During the Thomas Fire, for example, we were able to re-establish services in less than 24 hours, whereas many terrestrial providers remained down for months. From solar and wind powered towers, to backup generators, we also have significant expertise in utilizing alternative power methods, technologies that become critical during catastrophic weather events. Locally, I am actively working on a large-scale, state-wide project that will utilize a multitude of technologies, including mobile relay stations, to create true network resilience, ultimately preserving connectivity during disasters. Every region and every disaster in our country has its own subset of challenges. I am confident our Working Group can not only improve the resiliency of broadband infrastructure before disasters occur nationally, but also ensure that connectivity is both maintained and restored as quickly as possible.”

While the first formal meeting of the group has not been publicly announced, a complete list of members is available at https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DA-18-1121A1.docx.

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact Lexie Smith at [email protected].

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About GeoLinks

Headquartered in Southern California, GeoLinks is a leading telecommunications company and competitive local exchange carrier (CLEC) public utility, nationally recognized for its innovative Internet and Digital Voice solutions. Ranked first in category on Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing Companies in America in both 2017 and 2018, GeoLinks delivers Enterprise-Grade Internet, Digital Voice, SD-WANCloud On-ramping, Layer 2 Transport, and both Public and Private Turnkey Network Construction expertly tailored for businesses and Anchor Institutions nationwide.

GeoLinks’ accelerated success is largely due to its flagship product, ClearFiber™, which offers dedicated business-class Internet with unlimited bandwidth, true network redundancy, and guaranteed speeds reaching up to 10 Gbps. Named “Most Disruptive Technology”in the 2018 Central Coast Innovation Awards, GeoLinks’ ClearFiber™ network is backed by a carrier-grade Service Level Agreement boasting 99.999% uptime and 24/7 in-house customer support. With an average installation period of 4 to 7 days, GeoLinks is proud to offer the most resilient and scalable fixed wireless network on the market.

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Disaster Response and Recovery Working Group

FCC ANNOUNCES MEMBERSHIP OF THE BROADBAND DEPLOYMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE’S DISASTER RESPONSE AND RECOVERY WORKING GROUP - GeoLinksFCC ANNOUNCES MEMBERSHIP OF THE BROADBAND DEPLOYMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE’S DISASTER RESPONSE AND RECOVERY WORKING GROUP

Read Official Notice here: https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DA-18-1121A1.docx.

Released:  November 1, 2018

GN Docket No. 17-83

This Public Notice serves as notice that Federal Communications Commission (Commission) Chairman Ajit Pai has appointed members to serve on the Disaster Response and Recovery Working Group of the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC).  The members of this working group are listed in the Appendix.

The BDAC is organized under, and operates in accordance with, the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA).[1]  The BDAC’s mission is to provide advice and recommendations to the Commission on how to accelerate the deployment of high-speed Internet access.[2]

The BDAC’s Disaster Response and Recovery Working Group is charged with making recommendations on measures that can be taken to improve resiliency of broadband infrastructure before a disaster occurs, strategies that can be used during the response to a disaster to minimize the downtime of broadband networks, and actions that can be taken to more quickly restore broadband infrastructure during disaster recovery.  It is also charged with developing best practices for coordination among wireless providers, backhaul providers, and power companies during and after a disaster.

More information about the BDAC is available at https://www.fcc.gov/broadband-deployment-advisory-committee.  You may also contact Paul D’Ari, Designated Federal Officer (DFO) of the BDAC, at [email protected] or 202-418-1550; or the Deputy DFOs Deborah Salons at [email protected] or 202-418-0637, or Jiaming Shang at [email protected] or 202-418-1303

 

MEMBERS OF THE DISASTER RESPONSE AND RECOVERY

WORKING GROUP

 

Chair:

Red Grasso, FirstNet State Point of Contact

North Carolina Department of Information Technology

 

Vice-Chair:

Jonathan Adelstein, President & Chief Executive Officer*

Wireless Infrastructure Association

 

Members:

 

Skyler Ditchfield, Chief Executive Officer

GeoLinks

 

Andrew Afflerbach, Chief Executive Officer and Director of Engineering, CTC Technology and Energy

National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors

 

Allen Bell, Distribution Support Manager, Georgia Power Company*

Southern Company

 

Megan Bixler, Technical Program Manager for Communications Center and 911 Services

Association of Public Safety Communications Officials

 

Patrick Donovan, Senior Director, Regulatory Affairs

CTIA

 

Tony Fischer, Director, Information Technology

City of Germantown, Tennessee

 

Monica Gambino, Vice President, Legal

Crown Castle

 

Larry Hanson, Executive Director*

Georgia Municipal Association

 

David Hartshorn, Chief Executive Officer

Geeks Without Frontiers

 

Greg Hauser, Communications Branch Manager/Statewide Interoperability Coordinator,

North Carolina Emergency Management Division

National Emergency Management Association

 

Kurt Jacobs, Corporate Director, Emerging Technology & Solutions

JMA Wireless

 

Richard Kildow, Director of Business Continuity & Emergency Management

Verizon

 

Frank Korinek, Director of Government Affairs

Motorola

 

Wyatt Leehy, Information Technology Manager

Great Plains Communications

 

David Marshack, Telecommunications Regulatory Lead

Loon

 

Jim Matheson, Chief Executive Officer*

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

 

Kelly McGriff, Vice President & Deputy General Counsel*

Uniti Group

 

Wendy Moser, Commissioner, Colorado Public Utilities Commission

National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners

 

Alexandra Fernandez Navarro, Commissioner

Puerto Rico Public Service Regulatory Board

 

John O’Connor, Director, National Coordinating Center for Communications

Department of Homeland Security

 

Eddie Reyes, Prince William County Emergency Communications Center

National Public Safety Telecommunications Council

 

Rikin Thaker, Vice President, Telecommunications and Spectrum Policy*

Multicultural Media, Telecom and Internet Council

 

Pete Tomczak, Manager, Spectrum Coordination and Clearance

FirstNet

 

Rocky Vaz, Director of Emergency Management

City of Dallas, Texas

 

Joseph Viens, Senior Director of Government Affairs

Charter

 

Debra Wulff, Public Safety Director

Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

 

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Use of Spectrum Bands Above 24 GHz For Mobile Radio Services

Before the

Federal Communications Commission

Washington, DC 20554

In the Matter of Use of Spectrum Bands Above 24 GHz For Mobile Radio Services

Establishing a More Flexible Framework to Facilitate Satellite Operations in the 27.5-28.35 GHz and 37.5-40 GHz Bands

Amendment of Parts 1, 22, 24, 27, 74, 80, 90, 95, and 101 To Establish Uniform License Renewal, Discontinuance of Operation, and Geographic Partitioning and Spectrum Disaggregation Rules and Policies for Certain Wireless Radio Services

Allocation and Designation of Spectrum for Fixed-Satellite Services in the 37.5-38.5 GHz, 40.5-41.5 GHz and 48.2-50.2 GHz Frequency Bands; Allocation of Spectrum to Upgrade Fixed and Mobile Allocations in the 40.5-42.5 GHz Frequency Band; Allocation of Spectrum in the 46.9-47.0 GHz Frequency Band for Wireless Services; and Allocation of Spectrum in the 37.0-38.0 GHz and 40.0-40.5 GHz for Government Operations

GN Docket No. 14-177

IB Docket No. 15-256

WT Docket No. 10-112

IB Docket No. 97-95

 

REPLY COMMENTS OF CALIFORNIA INTERNET, L.P. DBA GEOLINKS

California Internet, L.P. DBA GeoLinks (“GeoLinks” or the “Company”) submits these reply comments in response to the Spectrum Frontiers Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“Frontiers Second FNPRM”).1

I. INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

GeoLinks serves the largest coverage area of any single fixed wireless Internet service provider in California. The Company’s fixed wireless technology platform depends on access to spectrum resources sufficient to support enterprise-level broadband connections. As such, GeoLinks has advocated before this Commission on a number of spectrum matters over the last year. While the proceedings may differ, there are a few over-arching policy considerations that GeoLinks has repeatedly asserted are necessary to ensure robust competition within the broadband marketplace. These include ensuring spectrum resources are available on a competitive basis and ensuring policies do not favor one technology over others. GeoLinks urges the Commission to apply these same considerations to ensure that there is competitive access to the millimeter wave (“mmW”) bands and associated equipment ecosystem.

II. DISCUSSION

A. The Commission Should Retain Pre-Auction Review and Limitations on Spectrum Holdings

GeoLinks strongly agrees with Starry, Inc. (“Starry”) that the Commission must reaffirm competition policies that prevent over-aggregation of critical spectrum resources.2 In the Frontiers Second FNPRM, the Commission proposes to eliminate the pre-auction limit of 1250 Megahertz for the 28 GHz, 37 GHz and 39 GHz bands.3 Limiting spectrum ownership is necessary to carry out the Commission’s mandate of “promoting economic opportunity and competition and ensuring new and innovative technologies are readily accessible to the American people by avoiding excessive concentration of licenses by disseminating licenses among a wide variety of applicants.”4 As Starry explains, spectrum holdings limitations have played an important role in the FCC’s competition policy for decades.5

GeoLinks agrees with Starry that establishing individual bidders’ limits in advance of an auction promotes transparency and provides all bidders with information necessary to facilitate rational bidding. 6 To the contrary, analyzing spectrum holdings after an auction will require winning bidders that exceed the threshold to divest excess spectrum after-the-fact. From a policy perspective, this creates a system where auction winners who have knowingly purchased more spectrum than they are allowed to have, get the opportunity to pick and choose the best spectrum and discard the rest. This creates the need for the FCC to reevaluate what spectrum will be left over after negotiating individual relinquishments and potentially create the need for an additional spectrum auction to license whatever remains in the band. The result is a system in which large incumbents with large amounts of capital are able to secure any spectrum they want with no need to account for what they already have.

Chairman Pai has stated that the Commission “ha[s] no business picking winners and losers in the marketplace.”7 However, creating a policy that allows large carriers to disregard spectrum limits would do just that. As Untied States Cellular Corporation explains, history has shown that unless large carriers are subject to reasonable spectrum acquisition restraints both pre and post-auction, they are likely to pursue mmW spectrum acquisition relentlessly, which will shut out smaller carriers who might otherwise bid on available spectrum.8 For these reasons, GeoLinks urges the Commission to retain pre-auction review and limitations on spectrum holdings.

B. The Commission Must Ensure a Robust Market for Equipment in the 24 GHz Band

In addition to ensuring that new and innovative technologies are capable of accessing spectrum resources, GeoLinks agrees with Starry that the Commission must also ensure “that all licensees in new spectrum bands have access to equipment ecosystems through effective operability requirements.”9 GeoLinks has previously advocated for spectrum policies that allow smaller service providers the ability to leverage market factors to drive down the cost of equipment. Unlike large incumbent carriers, smaller service providers lack the market power to ensure affordable equipment is available for all spectrum bands. As Starry explains, without operability requirements, these large carriers will be incentivized to inhibit competitive access to network equipment and devices. 10 This may result in underdevelopment of the band, a problem that the Commission has been dealing with in the 700 MHz band for years.11 For these reasons, GeoLinks urges the Commission establish operability requirements in the 24 GHz band.

C. The Commission Should Allow Sharing in the 37-37.6 GHz Band

In its opening comments, CTIA advocates for reconsideration of the Commission’s decision to allocate the 37-37.6 GHz Band on a coordinated basis.12 Specifically, CTIA urges the Commission to make this band available on a licensed basis claiming that an experimental sharing regime would be premature.13 However, GeoLinks believes that it is premature to suggest that the Commission close this band off to experimental use when mobile carriers themselves are not able to state explicitly how much spectrum them will need to roll out their 5G services.14 Instead, GeoLinks urges the Commission to finalize rules for shared access to the 37-37.6 GHz band to allow new technologies an opportunity to access these spectrum resources.

III. CONCLUSION

In conclusion, GeoLinks urges the Commission to ensure that there is competitive access to the mmW bands and associated equipment ecosystem by creating policies that ensure spectrum resources are available on a competitive basis without favoring one technology over others.

 

Respectfully submitted,

GEOLINKS, LLC

/s/ Skyler Ditchfield, Chief Executive Officer

/s/ Melissa Slawson, General Counsel/ V.P of Government Affairs and Education

February 22, 2018

 

1. Use of Spectrum Bands Above 24 GHz, et al., Second Report and Order, Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, Order on Reconsideration, and Memorandum Opinion and Order, 32 FCC Rcd 10988 (2017) (“Frontiers Second FNPRM”).
2 See Comments of Starry, Inc., GN Docket No. 14-177, et al. (filed Jan. 23, 2018) (“Starry Comments”), at 2.
3 Frontiers Second FNPRM at para. 105
4 See Section 309(j) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.
5 See Starry Comments at 2.
6 See Starry Comments at 3.
7 See Ajit Pai, Chairman, FCC Remarks on Restoring Internet Freedom (Nov. 28, 2017) (“We have no business picking winners and losers in the marketplace”).
8 See Comments of United States Cellular Corporation, GN Docket No. 14-177, et al. (filed Jan. 23, 2018), at 8.
9 Starry Comments at 5.
10 See Starry Comments at 5.
11 See Id.
12 Comments of CTIA, GN Docket No. 14-177, et al. (filed Jan. 23, 2018), at 10.
13 See Id.
14 See Comments of Verizon, GN Docket No. 14-177, et al. (filed Jan. 23, 2018), at 5, “It is too early to know how much bandwidth operators will need to provide customers with innovative 5G services.”
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Expanding Flexible Use in Mid-Band Spectrum Between 3.7 and 24 GHz

Before the

Federal Communications Commission

Washington, DC 20554

In the Matter of

Expanding Flexible Use in Mid-Band Spectrum Between 3.7 and 24 GHz

GN Docket No. 17-183

REPLY COMMENTS OF CALIFORNIA INTERNET, L.P. DBA GEOLINKS

California Internet, L.P. dba GeoLinks, LLC (“GeoLinks” or the “Company”) submits these reply comments in response to certain comments filed on the Notice of Inquiry (“NOI”) issued August 3, 2017 in the aforementioned docket.

Additional flexible access to mid-band spectrum would allow broadband providers to leverage wireless technologies to fill the gaps in the current broadband landscape. Fixed wireless technologies offer new opportunities to connect rural and unserved communities and offer competitive alternatives to incumbent providers in urban settings. GeoLinks submits these reply comments to provide input on potential opportunities for additional flexible access to mid-band spectrum.

DISCUSSION
Rules for the 3.7-4.2 GHz Band Should Be Changed to Promote Point-to-Multipoint Wireless Broadband Service
As explained in its opening comments, GeoLinks urges the Commission to structure a flexible use regime that will allow small and mid-sized wireless broadband providers to utilize mid-band spectrum for point-to-multipoint (“P2MP”) wireless broadband service. As commenters explain, the​ ​3.7–4.2​ ​GHz​ ​band​ ​is​ especially ​well-suited​ ​to​ ​support​ P2MP​ ​broadband​ ​access.[1] However, rule changes are needed to allow for this type of use in the 3.7-4.2 band.

GeoLinks agrees with commenters that the Commission should change its “full-band, full-arc” policy for licensing satellite earth stations.[2] As Microsoft states, the Commission “should initiate a process to update its rules regarding FSS earth stations so that they are protected only to the extent necessary to protect them from receiving harmful interference.”[3] More specifically, GeoLinks supports the BAC’s recommendation that the Commission could “modify its rules to permit FSS operators to retain their current licenses to operate across the entire 3700 – 4200 MHz band, but limit interference protection to the frequencies on which the earth station is actually operating at a given time.”[4] GeoLinks also supports commenters’ recommendation to clean up the FSS database.[5] If the database does reflect FSS earth stations that were never built or no longer exist, as asserted by several commenters, failure to update the information only serves to further limit use of the 3.7-4.2 GHz band.

The 3.7-4.2 GHz band Should Not Be Reserved for Mobile Wireless Use Only
GeoLinks disagrees with commenters that advocate that the 3.7-4.2 GHz band should be solely allocated for mobile wireless broadband use.[6] As an initial matter, GeoLinks fails to see how this type of allocation would help meet the Commission’s goals of expanding broadband deployment to unconnected Americans (especially in rural areas). As GeoLinks explains in its opening comments, P2MP connections offered via fixed wireless broadband service create opportunities to connect multiple users from one transmission point. With the appropriate spectrum allocation, fixed wireless providers can offer up to Gigabit+ P2MP connections of identical quality to fiber connections for a fraction of the cost.[7] This is something that cannot yet be accomplished over mobile broadband connections.

Additionally, allocation of this band for mobile wireless providers may not provide an immediate benefit to consumers like allocation for P2MP services would. T-Mobile states in its comments that designation of the 3.7-4.2 GHz band for mobile broadband would “complement wireless carriers’ use of spectrum in adjacent bands.”[8] T-Mobile further states that some of this adjacent band spectrum “may be made available in the future.”[9] Moreover, Verizon explains that this band “can support the high bandwidth carriers required for data-heavy 5G services”[10] – a future technology that is still years from full deployment. While adjacent bands do promote efficiencies, the efficiencies touted by certain commenters are too forward looking to base spectrum policy for this band on at this time. A policy of setting aside rare spectrum resources for prospective purposes when they could be utilized immediately to connect underserved areas promotes inefficiency and runs contrary to the Commission’s goals of closing the digital divide. Instead, GeoLinks urges the Commission to create spectrum sharing policies for this band that will promote the deployment of highspeed P2MP broadband services.

An Auction Mechanism is Not Appropriate for Mid-Band Spectrum
Some commenters advocate that spectrum licenses in the mid-band should be offered via an incentive auction.[11] While auctions are effective for some spectrum bands, GeoLinks maintains its position that an auction mechanism is not appropriate for mid-band spectrum. First, incentive auctions tend to only benefit large companies with large amounts of capital to spend. Small to mid-sized fixed wireless providers have the potential to offer highspeed broadband services that can meet the Commission’s speed and deployment goals for a fraction of the cost of traditional, fiber-based service providers. Therefore, GeoLinks emphasizes that any spectrum licenses granted in the mid-band spectrum should be granted on a basis that will allow these companies to obtain and utilize them. Second, as discussed above, auctions incentivize bidders to purchase spectrum resources as an asset for future use rather than for immediate use.[12] To meet the Commission’s broadband deployment goals, spectrum policies should be developed in a way that promotes connectivity immediately.

GeoLinks urges the Commission to grant spectrum licenses for the mid-band in a way that immediately promotes efficient use and deployment of highspeed broadband services. Specifically, GeoLinks urges the Commission to use a “light licensed” or Part 101-type licensing structure, especially with respect to the 3.7-4.2 GHz band.

CONCLUSION
In conclusion, GeoLinks urges the Commission to develop spectrum policy for the mid-band spectrum that allows for the effective deployment of P2MP wireless broadband technologies.

Respectfully submitted,

GEOLINKS, LLC

/s/ Skyler Ditchfield, Chief Executive Officer

/s/ Melissa Slawson, General Counsel/ V.P of Government Sales and Education

[1] See Comments of the Broadband Access Coalition (“BAC”), GN Docket No. 17-183 (filed Oct. 2, 2017) (“BAC Comments”), at 1. See also Comments of Google LLC and Alphabet Access, GN Docket No. 17-183 (filed Oct. 2, 2017) (“Google Comments”), at 2.
[2] See Comments of Microsoft Corporation, GN Docket No. 17-183 (filed Oct. 2, 2017) (“Microsoft Comments”), at 3. See also BAC Comments at 8, and Comments of Verizon, GN Docket No. 17-183 (filed Oct. 2, 2017) (“Verizon Comments”), at 12.
[3] Microsoft Comments at 3.
[4] BAC Comments at 8.
[5] See Google Comments at 4-5 and Microsoft Comments at 3-4.
[6] Comments of T-Mobile USA, Inc., GN Docket No. 17-183 (filed Oct. 2, 2017) (“T-Mobile Comments”), at 7. See Comments of CTIA, GN Docket No. 17-183 (filed Oct. 2, 2017) (“CTIA Comments”) at 6.
[7] Specifically, spectrum allocation of at least 250 MHz in the mid-band would be ideal for these connections.
[8] T-Mobile Comments at 10.
[9] Id.
[10] Verizon Comments at 14.
[11] See CTIA Comments at 5. See, generally, T-Mobile Comments.
[12] See FN 9, supra.

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FCC Chairman Ajit Pai Appoints GeoLinks’ CEO Skyler Ditchfield to the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai Appoints GeoLinks’ CEO Skyler Ditchfield to the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee

Recognizing GeoLinks as an industry thought-leader in the country’s evolving broadband discussion, the FCC formally appointed Skyler Ditchfield, CEO, to the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee’s Streamlining Federal Siting Working Group.

News Verified via FCC Public Notice GN Docket No.17-83

On Thursday, August 3, 2017, The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman, Ajit Pai, officially appointed California Internet, L.P., DBA GeoLinks’ CEO, Skyler Ditchfield, to serve on the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC or Committee). Ditchfield will represent GeoLinks as he serves on the BDAC’s Streamlining Federal Siting Working Group (SFSWG), 1 of 5 internal task forces operating within the overarching committee.

Established by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai on January 31, 2017, the BDAC provides advice and recommendations to the FCC regarding how to accelerate the deployment of high-speed Internet access by reducing and/or removing regulatory barriers to infrastructure investment. This Committee is intended to provide an effective means for stakeholders with interests in this area to exchange ideas and develop recommendations for the Commission, which will in turn enhance the Commission’s ability to carry out its statutory responsibility to encourage broadband deployment to all Americans.

The SFSWG is specifically charged with developing recommendations to improve the process of siting on federal lands and federally managed properties by:

Recommending standard procedures for facility siting
Examining and providing recommendations on how to standardize the duration of leases and easements
Considering whether to recommend a shot clock for the processing of applications for facilities siting on federal land by federal agencies
Exploring and reporting on possible methods for federal agencies to identify and report on coverage gaps and deficiencies
Recommending procedures for creating and maintaining a publicly accessible inventory of space that can be used to attach or install broadband infrastructure
“I am honored that Chairman Pai selected me to serve on the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee,” said Ditchfield. “Appointing a nimble, mid-sized, fixed wireless ISP like GeoLinks to the committee further proves his dedication to making progressive moves towards closing the digital divide. Pai recognizes that this is a critical moment in our country’s social and economic broadband discussion, and I am thrilled to offer GeoLinks’ insight and expertise on how to accelerate national broadband deployment. Furthermore, GeoLinks will be working relentlessly with the Microsoft Whitespace Projects, pushing for more rural and urban wireless spectrum, ultimately driving competition. We are passionate about getting things done as quickly as possible. Like Chairman Pai, GeoLinks realizes that the time to procrastinate is officially over—we’re ready to take action and create visible change now.”

Sitting alongside Ditchfield on the committee are industry-leaders such as Daniel Jorjani, Principal Deputy Solicitor and Acting Solicitor of the Department of Interior, Kellie McGinness Kubena, Director, Engineering and Environmental Staff Rural Utilities Service Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, John Saw, Chief Technology Officer of Sprint, and more.

For media inquiries or to schedule an interview with Skyler Ditchfield, please contact Lexie Olson at lolson(at)geolinks.com.

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About GeoLinks

Founded in 2011 by CEO, Skyler Ditchfield, and CTO, Ryan Hauf, GeoLinks is the fastest growing B2B fixed wireless Internet Service Provider (ISP) in California. Proud to service the largest coverage area of any single provider in the state, GeoLinks expanded its territory in 2017 delivering Enterprise-Grade Internet, Layer 2 Transport, and Turnkey Construction expertly tailored for all business and Anchor Institutions nationwide.

With industry leading installation times, GeoLinks’ flagship service, ClearFiber, offers customers fixed wireless on the most resilient and scalable network ever built. Boasting ultra-low latency, 99.999% uptime, sub 10ms jitter, and a 4-hour max response time, GeoLinks prides itself on consistently delivering the industry’s best Service Level Agreement.

Amongst its many accolades, GeoLinks was the largest construction grant winner for California K-12 schools and libraries in both 2016 and 2017. Servicing thousands of businesses across the country, GeoLinks officially became a CLEC and public utility in 2017.

About The Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee

On January 31, 2017, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced the formation of a new federal advisory committee, the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC or Committee), which will provide advice and recommendations for the Commission on how to accelerate the deployment of high-speed Internet access. The Commission intends to establish the BDAC for a period of two (2) years, with an expected starting date during the spring of 2017.

The BDAC’s mission is to make recommendations for the Commission on how to accelerate the deployment of high-speed Internet access, or “broadband,” by reducing and/or removing regulatory barriers to infrastructure investment. This Committee is intended to provide an effective means for stakeholders with interests in this area to exchange ideas and develop recommendations for the Commission, which will in turn enhance the Commission’s ability to carry out its statutory responsibility to encourage broadband deployment to all Americans.

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