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GeoLinks Named a Supplier to Telarus, Largest Master Agent in the U.S.

Camarillo, CA – (March 31, 2021) – GeoLinks, the fastest growing telecommunications company in California, announced today that it had been named a supplier to Telarus, the largest privately held technology services distributor (master agent) in the United States. Telarus is known and respected for its home-grown software pricing tools and unique mobile apps.

GeoLinks will add its FixedWireless, Flexible FiberOptic, SD-WAN, Hosted Voice products, and more to the Telarus portfolio, backed by an industry-leading service-level agreement, as part of the company’s strategic growth and accelerated network expansion plans.

“We know that Telarus selects companies based on their ability to provide unique services and consistent and reliable solutions,” said Phillip Deneef, chief strategy officer, GeoLinks. “We are extremely proud to join this robust agency known for excellence and expand the availability of our services across the U.S.”

“GeoLinks has become a force to be reckoned with since acquiring the fixed wireless infrastructure and spectrum licenses from TPx Communications (TPx). They are known for innovation and unparalleled customer service and are a perfect addition to our portfolio,” said Patrick Oborn, Telarus co-founder and CPO. “We are pleased that our partners can now offer their products and services to their clients.”

In forging a relationship with Telarus, GeoLinks will be well-positioned to continue expanding its geographical footprint in the U.S. The company also recently announced the introduction of GIGA-AIR, a groundbreaking fixed wireless radio platform that will enable gigabit and multi-gigabit fiber-like connectivity.

 

About GeoLinks

GeoLinks is one of the nation’s leading telecommunications companies, nationally recognized for its innovative Internet and Hosted Voice solutions. Headquartered in Southern California and ranked on Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing Companies in America three-years running, GeoLinks delivers Enterprise-Grade Internet, Digital Voice, SD-WANCloud On-ramping, Layer 2 Transport, and both Public and Private Turnkey Network Construction expertly tailored for businesses and Anchor Institutions nationwide. More information on the company can be found at www.GeoLinks.com.

 

About Telarus, Inc.

Built for You, Telarus is the largest privately held technology services distributor (master agent) in the United States. Our dynamic agent-partner community sources data, voice, cloud, and managed services through our robust portfolio of over 200 leading service providers. We are best known for our home-grown software pricing tools and mobile apps unique in the industry. To help our partners grow their businesses, we’ve assembled the best support organization in the industry, including Cybersecurity, SD-WAN, Cloud, Mobility, Contact Center, and ILEC specialty practices whose primary goal is to help our partners identify and design the right technology solutions for their customers. To learn more about the Telarus opportunity, please visit www.telarus.com.

 

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GeoLinks Contact:

Abbe Serphos

917-699-9661

[email protected]

 

 

 

GeoLinks Acquires 208 Spectrum Licenses from Verizon, Making it the Largest Holder of Active LMDS Licenses in the 29/31 GHz Bands

Camarillo, Calif., March 25, 2021 – GeoLinks, the fastest growing telecommunications company in California, today announced that it has entered into a deal to acquire 208 Local Multipoint Distribution Service (LMDS) band spectrum licenses from Verizon covering markets across the United States. The deal, once approved by the FCC, will make the company the largest holder of LMDS licenses in the 29/31 Ghz bands.  Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The acquisition reflects a total MHz/POP of 70,612,423,950. Markets in the spectrum license acquisition include New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Atlanta, Houston, Washington, DC, Boston, Tampa-St. Pete, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Detroit, Miami-Ft. Lauderdale, Charlotte, St. Louis, Raleigh-Durham and Indianapolis, among others.

“The acquisition of this 28 GHz spectrum will allow us to achieve vastly higher speed over longer distances,” said Skyler Ditchfield, co-founder and CEO, GeoLinks. “With this deal we will control our own airwaves and have the ability to provide gigabit and multi-gigabit speeds at lower prices and with fiber-like latency and jitter statistics to our customer base across these markets.”

Ditchfield continued, “Thanks to this acquisition, we will be able to deliver superior solutions to existing carriers in the largest cities in the U.S., expand service in suburban areas, and bring connectivity to more underserved markets, all while maintaining our commitment to excellence and reliability. We will also be able to further expand our closing of the digital divide in rural markets while bringing a service offering comparable to the urban markets.”

GeoLinks plans to utilize the acquired spectrum to support its current and growing customer base, offering faster speeds with fixed point-to-point and point-to-multi-point wireless services, and provide backhaul for 5G services. The spectrum is not suitable for flexible use.

 

This press release has been updated to reflect MHz/POP.

 

About GeoLinks

GeoLinks is one of the nation’s leading telecommunications companies, nationally recognized for its innovative Internet and Hosted Voice solutions. Headquartered in Southern California and ranked on Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing Companies in America three-years running, GeoLinks delivers Enterprise-Grade Internet, Digital Voice, SD-WAN, Cloud On-ramping, Layer 2 Transport, and both Public and Private Turnkey Network Construction expertly tailored for businesses and Anchor Institutions nationwide. More information on the company can be found at www.GeoLinks.com.

 

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Contact

Abbe Serphos

917-699-9661

[email protected]

What are the Best Rural Business Internet Options?

October 19th, 2020 [UPDATED]
Originally Published January 22nd, 2019

The Pros and Cons of Different Rural Business Internet Options

BroadbandNow Research reports that more than 41 million Americans don’t have access to broadband Internet. Similarly, a 2018 study conducted by Microsoft found that 162.8 million people still did “not use the Internet at broadband speeds.” Why? Inflated costs, poor availability, slow deployment, terrestrial restraints, and misguided land and airwave regulations contribute to a lack of broadband infrastructure in rural communities across America. Resulting inequalities in finances, education, and social status, encountered by those without access to the Internet versus those who do, has been coined the U.S. Digital Divide.

According to GeoLinks’GeoLinks’ Co-Founder and CEO Skyler Ditchfield, there are “Five Crucial Steps Needed To Close The U.S. Digital Divide.” The final and arguably most imperative item listed is America’s need to adopt a technology-agnostic, hybrid approach to broadband development. While technologies such as 5G and fiber were are prominent buzzwords, Fixed Wireless Internet, digital subscriber line (DSL), satellite, and cable all play an equally vital role in closing the divide.

When your company is deciding how to upgrade your connection (or get connected for the first time), it’s vital to compare business Internet providers and evaluate the services they offer. Learning about all the different rural business Internet options and their pros and cons will help you make a choice that’s right for your business. To that end, GeoLinks has put together this comparison guide of the different options available to rural businesses.

*Note that Dial-up Internet access is technically an option available in rural areas. Still, due to the requirements of always-on and reliable connections for business continuity in today’s marketplace, and with less than 0.3% of all Americans still using dial-up according to a study in 2018, dial-up isn’t discussed as a viable Internet option for rural businesses.

So, what technologies from business Internet Providers are available in rural America? Here are the pros and cons of various Rural Internet options:

Pros and Cons of Internet Options

Pros and Cons of Internet Options

Fixed Wireless Broadband Internet

Fixed wireless Internet providers serve high-speed broadband Internet access to a single location via radio waves. While capable of servicing suburban and urban communities, Fixed Wireless Internet is most widely known for reaching and connecting rural America quickly.

Pros of Fixed-Wireless Internet:

  • Quick to deploy – Fixed Wireless Internet networks are deployable in a fraction of the time of competing wired technologies. For example, GeoLinks ClearFiber™ fixed wireless Internet can be deployed in seven to 10 business days.
  • Cost-effective – by avoiding costly trenching, fixed wireless Internet networks are far less expensive to build and have a lower impact on the environment.
  • Widely available – because they use radio waves, fixed wireless Internet networks can reach areas “off the grid,” such as rural America.
  • Uptime – Fixed wireless Internet networks, like those engineered by GeoLinks, have multipoint redundancy built-in. Each circuit installed has at least one additional fixed wireless backhaul – often more – linking to a fiber connection, which provides always-on connectivity with 99.9999% uptime.
  • Unlimited Bandwidth – With ClearFiber™ fixed wireless Internet, your business gets unlimited bandwidth with no throttling or capping like satellite providers.

Cons of Fixed-Wireless Internet:

  • Line of Sight (LOS) – because circuits require direct LOS, trees or large buildings in the connection path can cause signal interference.
  • Bandwidth Cost – Bandwidth can be more expensive than DSL, Cable, and some Satellite providers.
  • dsl cable rural internet

    DSL Broadband 

    DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) broadband is a wireline technology that transmits data over traditional copper telephone lines installed to homes and businesses. Because it operates on pre-existing phone lines, DSL can be quickly installed when infrastructure is present.

    Pros of DSL Internet:

    • Accessible – because DSL runs through phone lines, it ‘sit’s more widely available nationwide. (According to broadbandnow.com, DSL has 90% coverage nationwide.)
    • It’s relatively inexpensive – the cost to install and maintain is less than many other broadband technologies, such as Fiber.

    Cons of DSL Internet:

    • Slow speeds – rural DSL speeds are generally between 128 Kbps – 3 Mbps.
    • Inconsistent network quality – because circuit quality relies heavily on the distance from an ISP’s ISP’s central hub, a significant problem for many businesses in rural areas, speeds and network reliability are inconsistent.

    Satellite Internet Vs. Fixed Wireless - GeoLinks

    Satellite Internet

    Satellite Internet beams data from your Internet provider to a satellite in space and then back to a dish at a user’s location. Historically, the technology’s primary use has been to connect businesses in rural areas that don’t have access to wired services.

    Pros of Satellite Internet:

    • Expansive availability – because it transmits to a satellite in space, it ‘sit’s available virtually anywhere on earth.
    • Decent speeds – delivering speeds up to 100 Mbps, Satellite is faster than DSL.

    Cons of Satellite Internet:

    • Latency issues – Satellite has inherent latency issues – this is especially problematic with video conferencing and VoIP applications.
    • Unreliable – circuit quality is susceptible to moisture (weather) and objects, such as trees and vegetation.
    • High cost – Satellite Internet is one of the most expensive broadband technologies on the market.

    cable broadband rural internet

    Cable Broadband

    Cable Broadband utilizes a modem to access the Internet through the same coaxial cables that deliver pictures and sound to a user’s television. Mainly used to service residential customers, cable networks are considered shared circuits.

    Pros of Cable Broadband Internet:

    • Easy and quick to install – because it uses existing infrastructure, it sometimes can be immediately available.
    • Faster – Capacity to be substantially faster than other types of broadband connections such as satellite and DSL.

    Cons of Cable Broadband:

    • Unreliable connection – Cable connections are shared with nearby users, causing performance issues, such as varying speeds, during peak usage times.
    • Rural limitations – due to the lack of infrastructure extending outside of urban communities, cable often is unavailable.

    cellular mobile broadband rural internet

    Cellular Mobile Broadband Internet

    Mobile broadband delivers Internet connectivity over a mobile network – the same infrastructure utilized by your smartphone. Mobile broadband is accessible via portable wireless hotspots and wireless modems from anywhere with a cellular connection.

    Pros of Mobile Broadband:

    • Easy access – assuming there is reception in the area, it has the potential to be immediately available.
    • Quick and easy install – the “plug and play feature” of this technology eliminates the need for physical cables, phone lines, or an electricity source.

    Cons of Mobile Broadband:

    • Inconsistent coverage – If you live in a remote area, you may not get cellular reception, preventing access altogether.
    • Unreliable performance – Average rural mobile speeds fall around 12 to 15 Mbps and fluctuate depending on location and the number of people connected to the network.
    • Capped data usage – To prevent network saturation, mobile broadband plans typically come with data caps. Overages can be expensive.

    flexible fiberoptic internet

    Fiber Broadband Internet

    Fiber broadband provides Internet access by converting electrical signals carrying data to light and sends the light through transparent glass fibers. It is one of, if not the most requested broadband technology on the market.

    Pros of Fiber Broadband:

    • Speed – Fiber can deliver multi-gig speeds making it one of the fastest broadband options on the market alongside fixed wireless.
    • Scalable and flexible bandwidth – once installed, bandwidth can be increased or decreased almost on-demand.

    Cons of Fiber Broadband:

    • Not available everywhere – Fiber is currently available in only 32% of the country.
    • Expensive and slow to deploy – fiber optic cable is exceptionally costly to deploy and requires trenching (often stalled by lengthy permitting processes.)

    Comparing the Pros and Cons of Rural Business Internet Options

    Rural Business Internet Comparison Chart
     

    While there are advantages and disadvantages to each Rural Business Internet option, these technologies can be strategically deployed to create a ubiquitous solution capable of delivering multi-gigabit bandwidth to communities across the country. This technology-agnostic, hybrid network approach is key to closing the digital divide.

    Ready to Try GeoLinks’ Rural Business Internet Option ClearFiber™ Fixed Wireless Internet?

    Request a Quote
     
     
     

    Need Internet Immediately?

    Talk with a GeoLinks Internet specialist now.
    Call 888.225.1571
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    Not All Connections Are Created Equal

    With the sudden surge in remote work and distance learning, internet connectivity has been put to the test. As we predicted, shared circuits in residential areas have been stretched beyond their limits with web surfing and video streaming competing for bandwidth with videoconferencing and large data uploads.

    These slowdowns are not unexpected. Most residential internet circuits were not designed to accommodate the increased levels of activity they’re experiencing, which rivals that of enterprise-grade broadband circuits typically used by businesses.

    Additionally, the vast majority of residential internet customers share a connection with their neighbors so bandwidth must be divvied up amongst all the households that are connected to it. While these connections fit the needs of residential customers under most normal circumstances, conditions are far removed from normal at the moment.

    Subscribers to GeoLinks’ ClearFiber network have not experienced any slowdown, whatsoever. Our Fixed Wireless service provides every customer with a dedicated connection, eliminating the need to share and guaranteeing high speeds that are unaffected by the activity of any neighboring circuits.

    Clearly, not all internet connections are created equal. GeoLinks’ Fixed Wireless guarantees speeds and provides residential and business customers with additional advantages, such as fast installation (5-7 days) and 99.999 percent uptime.

    To learn more about how you can benefit from Fixed Wireless internet, contact us at (888) 225-1571 or  visit our Youtube channel to watch a three-minute video primer.

    GeoLinks’ CEO Skyler Ditchfield Appointed to the FCC’s Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee

    The Federal Communications Commission announces Skyler Ditchfield as a member of the newly re-chartered Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee

    CAMARILLO, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–On May 16, 2019, Chairman Ajit Pai of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced his appointment of Skyler Ditchfield, Co-Founder and CEO of GeoLinks, to serve as an official member of the newly re-chartered Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC). Of the 39 listed appointees, Skyler Ditchfield serves as the only Southern California representative.

    According to the FCC’s official release, “In its second term, the BDAC will continue its work to craft recommendations for the Commission on ways to accelerate the deployment of high-speed Internet access, or ‘broadband,’ by reducing and/or removing regulatory barriers to infrastructure investment and strengthening existing broadband networks in communities across the country.” The release continues by outlining the BDAC as an opportunity for interested stakeholders to exchange ideas and develop recommendations to the Commission on broadband deployment, to enhance the Commission’s ability to deploy broadband to all Americans.

    Previously appointed to the Streamlining Federal Siting Working Group in 2017, and the Disaster Response and Recovery Working Group in 2018 (both BDAC sub groups), Ditchfield’s elevated appointment will enable him to provide strategic recommendations and influence action to close the digital divide on a national scale.

    “I have been continually impressed by Chairman Pai, his administration, and all the work that they have done thus far,” stated Ditchfield. “They’ve truly worked hard to level the playing field for all sized ISPs. They’ve put forward significant new dollars towards broadband investment and are staying true to their promise of closing the digital divide. With GeoLinks’ founding mission being to close the digital divide, we have a multitude of case studies that have proven capable of closing the gap in California. Being that all of these projects demonstrate proven and transferrable methods, I am very excited to get to work with both the BDAC and my two designated working groups to cultivate the most realistic and feasible path forward nationally.”

    The renewed BDAC will hold its first meeting on Thursday, June 13, 2019, in the Commission Meeting Room at FCC Headquarters, located in Washington, DC. The meeting is open to the public. The FCC will accommodate as many attendees as possible; however, admittance will be limited to seating availability. The Commission will also provide audio and/or video coverage of the meeting over the Internet from the FCC’s web page at www.fcc.gov/live.

    The FCC’s official Public Notice can be accessed online via the following link: https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-announces-re-chartered-bdac-membership-and-first-meeting

    For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact Lexie Smith, VP of Business Development, at [email protected].

    About GeoLinks

    Headquartered in Southern California, GeoLinks is a leading telecommunications company and competitive local exchange carrier (CLEC) public utility, nationally recognized for its innovative Internet and Digital Voice solutions. Ranked first in category on Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing Companies in America in both 2017 and 2018, GeoLinks delivers Enterprise-Grade Internet, Digital Voice, SD-WANCloud On-ramping, Layer 2 Transport, and both Public and Private Turnkey Network Construction expertly tailored for businesses and Anchor Institutions nationwide.

    GeoLinks’ accelerated success is largely due to its flagship product, ClearFiber™, which offers dedicated business-class Internet with unlimited bandwidth, true network redundancy, and guaranteed speeds reaching up to 10 Gbps. Named “Most Disruptive Technology” in the 2018 Central Coast Innovation Awards, GeoLinks’ ClearFiber™ network is backed by a carrier-grade Service Level Agreement boasting 99.999% uptime and 24/7 in-house customer support. With an average installation period of 4 to 7 days, GeoLinks is proud to offer the most resilient and scalable fixed wireless network on the market.

    Contacts

    Media Inquiries:
    GeoLinks
    Lexie Smith, VP of Business Development
    [email protected]

    Connect America Fund Making Federal Dollars Work for California

    Presented at CENIC’s 2019 Annual Conference.

    SPEAKER:

    Skyler Ditchfield, Co-Founder and CEO, GeoLinks

    ABOUT:

    The Connect America Fund Phase II Auction (CAF II) was created by the Federal Communications Commission to distribute federal grant dollars to enable broadband infrastructure buildout to rural areas of the country that lack basic broadband services. In August 2018, GeoLinks was awarded approx. $88 Million to deploy high-speed broadband network facilities to eligible areas in California and Nevada (to be distributed over 10 years). In this discussion, GeoLinks’ CEO, Skyler Ditchfield, will discuss the CAF II application process, awarded areas, and opportunities for creating synergies between CAF II and other broadband grant programs. He will also discuss possible pain points and policy changes needed to streamline deployment and ensure CAF II funding is used as efficiently as possible to connect unserved Americans.

    Strategies for Addressing the Broadband Digital Divide

    Strategies for Addressing the Broadband Digital Divide

    Presented at CENIC’s 2019 Annual Conference.

    Featured Speakers:

    Skyler Ditchfield, Co-Founder and CEO, GeoLinks | Louis Fox, CEO and President, CENIC | Matt Rantanen, Director of Technology, Southern California Tribal Chairmen’s Association | Sunne Wright McPeak, CEO, California Emerging Technology Fund | Steven Huter, Director, Network Startup Resource Center, University of Oregon

    About:

    A recent article in the New York Times titled, “Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says” (12/4/18), notes that, “Fast internet service is crucial to the modern economy, and closing the digital divide is seen as a step toward shrinking the persistent gaps in economic opportunity, educational achievement and health outcomes in America.” While the FCC concludes that broadband is not available to 24.7 million Americans, a recent study by Microsoft states that “162.8 million Americans do not use the internet at broadband speed” and that this “discrepancy is particularly stark in rural areas.”

    Many projects that might address this broadband disparity have been unattractive to private sector providers, given the difficulty of generating a return on investment necessary for the capital expenditures for construction of necessary middle-mile infrastructure. And, while there is a tendency to see the digital divide as a rural issue, many urban areas show a similar lack of access to fast home Internet, though often for different reasons — lack of affordable broadband and/or lack of motivation for broadband adoption.

    The picture is not entirely gloomy: There are many creative approaches to address issues of access, affordability, and adoption, often pooling sources of funds, integrating two (or more) broadband technologies, and through partnerships that involve public, government, and private sector partners. The panelists, all of whom are engaged in every aspect of broadband from public policy to project deployment, will highlight and discuss successful strategies to address the broadband digital divide and engage conference participants in a discussion about how to scale locally instantiated projects to reach across all of California (and beyond).

    Grow Food, Grow Jobs: How Broadband Can Boost Farming in California’s Central Valley

    Original Article

    The Central Valley of California is an enormous economic force, producing over one-third of the nation’s vegetables, two-thirds of its fruit and nuts, and contributing billions of dollars annually to the California economy. Unfortunately, many of California’s farming communities still lack reliable broadband Internet access. This lack prevents farmers from using cutting-edge technologies and real-time data inputs that would improve agricultural production, and severely hampers educational opportunities that support farming and growth. A particularly acute example of this is in the western Central Valley, where less than half of the population has access to broadband, the median income is $20,289, and agriculture is a leading economic driver. Government, education, and industry leaders in the area are working to provide communities with the resources they need to grow food as well as jobs.

    Robert Tse, the California Rural Broadband Development Coordinator for the USDA and longtime organizer for California’s agricultural community, imagines what farmers can accomplish with greater connectivity. While working with technology developers and farmers, Robert has seen first-hand the benefits technology can bring. “When moisture sensors are deployed in fields,” Tse said, “agricultural economists have found that farmers can realize a 10 to 20% decrease in water use as well as a significant increase in field output.” In a state plagued by drought, using less water to grow more food is a major improvement. Benefits like these would have an immediate impact on farming communities and overall production. But, without broadband connectivity, such tools remain out of reach for many farmers.

    Expanding connectivity also enables the dissemination of real-time information, like weather predictions and experimental approaches to crop management. One of the main missions of the UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) is to provide farmers with up-to-date science and information. Gabe Youtsey, UC ANR’s chief innovation officer, emphasized how improved connectivity would further UC ANR’s mission: “To fulfill our education mission, research centers host local farmers at meetings and field days. With connectivity, those that live too far away to travel will be able to receive real-time video streams. Also, online learning can significantly expand the reach and impact of the 200 locally based cooperative extension advisors and specialists.” Several of UC ANR’s facilities now have broadband after being hooked up to the CalREN fiber backbone.

    Vice Chancellor Linda Thomas of the West Hills Community College District is particularly in tune with the need for broadband access in conjunction with education. In her presentation at the 2018 CENIC annual conference, she cited the Brookings Institution’s summary of the impact poor connectivity has on education: “Rural communities are less likely to efficiently provide Internet access to students in public schools, as most rural schools lack access to high-speed fiber and pay more than twice as much for bandwidth. In a growing world of personalized online curricula, Internet-based research, and online testing, this severely restricts rural students from educational opportunities their urban counterparts may enjoy.” West Hills Community College offers academic degrees like agriculture science technology and irrigation engineering technology. These programs teach students to use cutting-edge farming technology and software, but operation of such tools requires fast, efficient broadband.

    Yet extending access to these rural areas is often neglected, due to last-mile and middle-mile challenges. Laying fiber cable in the ground is not feasible in many places that remain disconnected. That’s where CEO Skyler Ditchfield and his company GeoLinks come in. GeoLinks is trailblazing the use of fixed wireless technologies to expand access with approaches that require less time and less infrastructure. “It can be difficult to meet the broadband needs of rural California with fiber connections alone,” said Ditchfield. “Fixed wireless broadband can meet the data needs, fiscal demands, and timeline to deploy these critical technologies across California.” GeoLinks uses solar and wind technologies to power carefully sited wireless towers that form a grid of connectivity across a community.

    Now that wireless extension approaches have evolved enough to provide quality, reliable broadband to rural areas, the challenge is organizing community partners for widespread implementation. CENIC is partnering with organizations — as it has done with UC ANR, GeoLinks, and others — to develop plans for better connectivity, find funding to extend a wireless mesh into the unlinked reaches of the state, and ultimately help more farmers grow food and jobs. As Gabe Youtsey noted, “California communities must take control of their broadband future to ensure that everyone can participate in our digital economy by partnering to create new technologies and business models.”

    Watch plenary panels and check out more content from the 2018 CENIC Annual Conference.

    Camarillo-based GeoLinks acquires broadband provider Vectus

    Original Article

    Camarillo-based GeoLinks has acquired Southern California fixed wireless broadband provider Vectus.

    The acquisition includes an outright procurement of the internet service provider’s fixed wireless network, key staff and existing customer base ultimately expanding GeoLinks’ existing ClearFiber™ network and coverage map.

    The Vectus network offers dense coverage throughout Orange County, Riverside, San Bernardino and Los Angeles counties.

    “With founding roots in Southern California, GeoLinks has been familiar with Vectus’ robust wireless network for quite some time,” said GeoLinks CEO Skyler Ditchfield. “When the opportunity to officially acquire Vectus came to the table, all parties knew immediately that merging networks would be seamless from an operations standpoint, and prove immensely beneficial to existing and future clientele. With contracts finalized, company migration will commence immediately, enabling GeoLinks to further expand its coverage map while simultaneously increasing our overall network capacity, redundancy and ability to deliver higher bandwidth.”

    David Saylor, president and chief technology officer of Vectus, said: “Post-acquisition, I have full confidence that all existing Vectus customers will continue to receive the same exceptional service they’ve become accustomed to. At our cores, GeoLinks and Vectus have synergistic beliefs — always put the customer first. By combining assets, all current and future customers will now have access to an even more resilient and redundant wireless network.”

    The companies’ clients will encounter no disruptions of service during the network transition, GeoLinks said.