Tag Archive for: Digital Divide

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GeoLinks General Counsel, Melissa Slawson Elected as WISPA Chair

August 5, 2020 2:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

Camarillo, CA – Melissa Slawson, General Counsel and Vice President of Government Affairs and Education for GeoLinks has been named Chair of the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association’s (WISPA) Rural Expansion Working Group. An independent entity that advises the WISPA President, the Working Group focuses on collaboration among WISPA members, ensuring regulatory compliance and industry best practices while advocating for equitable public policy that promotes responsible and successful network growth.

“I’m very excited for the opportunity to work closely with my industry colleagues to advocate for effective public policy and further strengthen our relationships with stakeholders and regulators,” said Slawson.  “As we’ve continued to grow our network year-over-year at GeoLinks, we’ve seen the value that comes from WISPA’s collaborative industry focus.  I look forward to utilizing that strength to continue making strides in industry advancements and to advocate for positive policy that will help drive forward the goal to connect rural and unserved Americans.”

GeoLinks has a long history of working to close the Digital Divide.  As the largest grant winner in the state of California in the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Connect America Fund Phase II Auction, GeoLinks is currently rolling out network infrastructure in rural California to connect historically underserved areas. Moreover, the company has focused deployment efforts on connecting rural schools and libraries throughout the state of California and beyond since 2016 and has frequently been the largest construction grant winner for Calif. K-12 schools and libraries.

As the FCC prepares for the the Rural Digital Opportunity Fund (RDOF) Auction, a program that aims to further extend broadband access throughout America, WISPA continues to advocate for the fixed wireless industry, urging a technologically neutral approach toward bridging the digital divide. “At GeoLinks, we have proven that fixed wireless presents unprecedented advantages in the quest to deliver internet access for all,” concluded Slawson. “Through effective advocacy efforts, we can further leverage it as a tool to overcome the ever-increasing challenges Americans living in underconnected areas continue to face every day.”

 

About GeoLinks:

Headquartered in Southern California, GeoLinks is a leading telecommunications company and competitive local exchange carrier (CLEC) public utility, nationally recognized for its innovative Internet and Hosted Voice solutions. Ranked on Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing Companies in America three-years running, GeoLinks delivers Enterprise-Grade Internet, Hosted Voice, SD-WAN, Cloud On-ramping, Layer 2 Transport, and both Public and Private Turnkey Network Construction expertly tailored for businesses and Anchor Institutions nationwide.

GeoLinks Formally Approved by USAC to Begin CAF Build Out

The Universal Service Administrative Company has officially cleared GeoLinks to begin CAF II build outs in California and Nevada

CAMARILLO, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–On Wednesday, June 5th, 2019 the Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC) formally approved GeoLinks to start receiving funding for the Company’s Connect America Fund Phase II (CAF II) buildout in California and Nevada. Announced by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in August of 2018 as the largest CAF II winner in the state of California, and 5th largest winner in the nation overall, with GeoLinks’ deployment plans and Letters of Credit officially approved, the innovative telecom will officially begin broadband deployment this summer.

Awarded a total of $87.8M in the auction, GeoLinks will provide more than 11,000 rural locations across California and Nevada with Internet at 100 megabits per second. The Company is also confident that this new infrastructure will simultaneously reduce the cost of bringing high speed broadband access to anchor institutions, such as Schools, Libraries, Hospitals, and Community Colleges, throughout both states.

“We are thrilled to have officially cleared both the FCC and USAC’s approval process for CAF II,” stated GeoLinks’ Co-Founder and CEO Skyler Ditchfield. “While the announcement back in August was undoubtedly exciting, we are now officially in the position to begin deployment throughout both states.”

With the GeoLinks’ team fully prepared to break ground, the Company is now looking forward to participating in the FCC’s LIFT America Act, which will support another $40B worth of broadband infrastructure deployment in aims of closing the digital divide.

For media inquiries and interview requests, please contact Lexie Smith at [email protected]

Get to know GeoLinks’ General Counsel and VP of Government Affairs and Education Melissa Slawson

Melissa Slawson - GeoLinks

1. Let’s start with the basics, what’s your role at GeoLinks?

My official title is General Counsel and V.P. of Government Affairs and Education. I handle all legal and regulatory matters, which includes tracking policies and legislation that may affect GeoLinks’ business and advocating for GeoLinks’ interests before various regulatory bodies (including the FCC). In short…I’m the lawyer, and I make sure we follow rules and the rules work for us.

2. What’s your favorite part about working for GeoLinks?

I love how fast-paced everything is. There’s never time to get bogged down in the weeds of an issue because a decision usually has to be made quickly. It has made me good at thinking on my feet, researching issues efficiently, and trusting my experience.

Melissa Slawson - GeoLinks - Jerry Brown3. What got you to the position you are in today…what came before GeoLinks?

I’ve been practicing law in the telecommunications regulatory space for over 11 years (wow…that sounds so long when you type it out). I started at the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) as a regulator, then entered private practice at a law firm specializing in regulatory work for a variety of telecommunications companies (cable, wireline, wireless, etc.), and then was GC for a small wireless company. The breadth of my legal experience and seeing the telecom world from multiple perspectives really prepared me for my role at GeoLinks. I understand the business side but also understand how regulators and lawmakers see the industry. That’s invaluable when trying to traverse the sometimes rocky legal landscape of providing telecom services.   

4. What government related project are you most passionate about?

I have always tried to make sure that the work I do is also doing good. I started my career as a public servant and while I have moved to the private sector, there is still good to be done. Specifically, I am passionate about connectivity for all. All people, rich or poor, urban or rural, etc. etc. etc. should have access to telecommunications services. This is an issue that I have worked on in some capacity throughout my entire career, and I am so happy to be working for a company with a founding mission to close the digital divide.  

5. Outside of work…what is your favorite pastime or hobby?

Melissa Slawson - geolinks

I started taking Improv classes last May and have started performing fairly regularly. Otherwise, I spend my non-work time doing crossfit, spending time with friends and my dog, Logan, cooking…and watching TV. I love TV.  

6. What’s something most of your coworkers don’t know about you?

I’ve never had a cavity. Thanks, Mom!

7. Alright pressure is on….give us your best or favorite motivational quote?

“Wherever you go, there you are.”  It’s a simple statement and really, quite painfully obvious, but I take its meaning to be pretty deep. Wherever you go in this world, no matter who you meet, what job you are doing, etc., you are still you. It is a constant. It is a center. And if things get hard or weird, you can fall back on knowing who you are and move forward from there. And by the same token, it means to be true to yourself, your beliefs, and your values no matter how the world around you changes. I strive to be me all the time.

8. You are allowed to do anything you want, anywhere in the world, for one whole day…what do you do and where do you go?

Be a rockstar.  I want a full sleeve of tattoos, crazy hair, and to sing in front of a stadium full of screaming fans. Sounds amazing!!!

9. Congratulations on recently being elected onto the Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband Coalition’s (SHLB) Board of Expert Advisors. So, what exactly is SHLB and how do you contribute?

I’m excited about being part of the SHLB Board. SHLB is doing some amazing work to close the digital divide by connecting anchor institutions (schools, libraries, hospitals, etc.) which are cornerstones of so many communities. It’s just another piece of the puzzle that is getting connectivity to all Americans. Being part of the board means helping shape the path that SHLB will forge in its efforts over the next few years. It also means having direct input into how companies can help (and be incentivized to help) SHLB’s mission.

Melissa Slawson - GeoLinks - SHLB

10. What’s next…what are you most excited for when you think of your future with GeoLinks?

With our recent Connect America Fund award, all of the work we’re doing to connect anchor institutions, and other opportunities we’re engaged in to help connectivity in California, I am so excited to see how GeoLinks can help change the digital landscape in California and beyond. In just a few short years, GeoLinks will be providing high speed broadband services to areas that may have otherwise never had more than dial-up speeds. (If that!) We are doing good while being successful in business. THAT is my American dream.

A BORDERLESS WORLD: THE FUTURE OF FIBER OPTICS AND 5G

Read entire original article on JuicedSystems

There’s no doubt that the world has become increasingly smaller and smaller. The physical distance among different countries and continents seems to matter less as one can communicate and even engage in commerce, wherever we are, all with just a click of a few buttons. The development of the internet is already a feat in itself, but humanity’s insatiable quest for better and more efficient ways of conducting life activities has led us to another accomplishment: the discovery of fiber optics.

Fiber-optic technology uses light pulses to transmit digital data through thin long glass fibers that are bundled as cables and usually installed underground. This method of transmission promises high-speed data transfer that is less likely to suffer from electrometric interference or long periods of latency. Using fiber optics also reduces the occurrence of electrocution, fire, and other hazards that copper and similar cables are vulnerable to.

Those reasons alone provide enough impetus for certain industries, states, and countries to gradually integrate fiber optics into their ICT systems. However, the cost and the expansiveness of the project of rewiring the entire digital world pose a challenge in achieving such a lofty ambition.

What will be the impact of using fiber optics and 5G networks on the internet of things and on businesses everywhere around the world? Twelve IT experts share their thoughts on this important question, and their responses are sure to ignite an interesting discussion. Use these quick links to go directly to your favorite experts, or you can get comfortable and start scrolling (since they’re all epic responses anyway)….

Lexie Smith, GeoLinks

“While different technologies, I do believe fiber and 5G share a commonality when we look towards the future. Neither technology is a “one size fits all solution.”

Fiber is great—but it’s incredibly expensive and slow to deploy, making it an unrealistic solution for much of rural America. 5G’s promise to deliver higher bandwidth, lower latency, reduced packet loss, and overall increased system capacity than its 4G and 3G predecessors, is still generating both high expectations and severe skepticism. There are still countless issues with the technology, such as your hand or body blocking the signal.

Ultimately, when we look towards the future of broadband and IoT, all existing technologies—from fixed wireless, to satellite, to fiber, etc.—have advantages and disadvantages. However, they all solve a need and, when used together, can eventually close the digital divide.”  

About Lexie Smith:
Lexie Smith serves as the VP of business development, leading public relations, marketing, and business development at GeoLinks, California’s fastest-growing Telecom, and Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing WISP in America.

Read: “Is 5G Worth All the Hype? Industry experts weigh in on the global telecom debate”

Invisible Infrastructure Connecting Rural and Unserved Areas via Spectrum

Presented at CENIC’s 2019 Annual Conference.

SPEAKERS:

Melissa Slawson, General Counsel and VP of Government Affairs and Education, GeoLinks | Louis Fox, President and CEO, CENIC | Rachelle Chong, Attorney/Lobbyist, Law Office of Rachelle Chong | Luis Wong, CEO, K-12 High Speed Network

ABOUT:

Millions of Americans still lack access to high-speed broadband service, especially in rural areas. According to data collected by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), as of the end of 2016, more than 500,000 households were without access to internet service of at least 6 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload, the minimum threshold for high-speed service in California. This is due largely to the costs associated with building fiber networks to these unserved areas. Wireless services may provide cost-effective solutions and bring much-needed high-speed access to these communities and the anchor institutions that serve them. This panel will explore the role of spectrum-based wireless technologies (i.e. fixed wireless) in closing the digital divide; the benefits to various industry segments and success stories using this technology; and what spectrum policy changes are needed to promote this kind of connectivity at both the federal and state levels.

 

Strategies for Addressing the Broadband Digital Divide

Strategies for Addressing the Broadband Digital Divide

Presented at CENIC’s 2019 Annual Conference.

Featured Speakers:

Skyler Ditchfield, Co-Founder and CEO, GeoLinks | Louis Fox, CEO and President, CENIC | Matt Rantanen, Director of Technology, Southern California Tribal Chairmen’s Association | Sunne Wright McPeak, CEO, California Emerging Technology Fund | Steven Huter, Director, Network Startup Resource Center, University of Oregon

About:

A recent article in the New York Times titled, “Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says” (12/4/18), notes that, “Fast internet service is crucial to the modern economy, and closing the digital divide is seen as a step toward shrinking the persistent gaps in economic opportunity, educational achievement and health outcomes in America.” While the FCC concludes that broadband is not available to 24.7 million Americans, a recent study by Microsoft states that “162.8 million Americans do not use the internet at broadband speed” and that this “discrepancy is particularly stark in rural areas.”

Many projects that might address this broadband disparity have been unattractive to private sector providers, given the difficulty of generating a return on investment necessary for the capital expenditures for construction of necessary middle-mile infrastructure. And, while there is a tendency to see the digital divide as a rural issue, many urban areas show a similar lack of access to fast home Internet, though often for different reasons — lack of affordable broadband and/or lack of motivation for broadband adoption.

The picture is not entirely gloomy: There are many creative approaches to address issues of access, affordability, and adoption, often pooling sources of funds, integrating two (or more) broadband technologies, and through partnerships that involve public, government, and private sector partners. The panelists, all of whom are engaged in every aspect of broadband from public policy to project deployment, will highlight and discuss successful strategies to address the broadband digital divide and engage conference participants in a discussion about how to scale locally instantiated projects to reach across all of California (and beyond).

Is 5G Worth All the Hype?

Industry experts weigh in on the global telecom debate

The telecom industry kicked 2019 off by continuing the highly publicized debate over the opportunities, or lack thereof, that 5G presents modern day society. The technology’s promise to deliver higher bandwidth, lower latency, reduced packet loss, and overall increased system capacity than its 4G and 3G predecessors, is still generating both high expectations and severe skepticism.

With the gradual emergence of autonomous vehicles, smart cities, and all things IoT, advocates and hopeful early adopters believe that 5G technology will support innovation and transform the world as we know it. Conversely, critics attest that the so called “next generation” is overly-hyped and still faces a magnitude of serious hurdles before it can prove revolutionary.

To weigh in on the debate, I asked a panel of diverse industry experts to comment on the following question:

What do you think of 5G, is it worth all the hype?

___________________

Catherine McNally

Internet Specialist, HighSpeedInternet.com

In 2016, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) found that 92.3% of Americans have access to speeds of 25 Mbps or more—but more than 24 million Americans don’t have access to internet speeds that meet 25 Mbps. Because 5G nodes don’t necessarily require as much infrastructure as a cell tower, they can be used in areas lacking wireless coverage. This will extend wireless speeds of at least 10 Mbps (the FCC’s current definition of mobile LTE broadband) to rural areas lacking in Internet options. If done right, 5G will help level the current rural-urban divide when it comes to Internet speeds, so I think the hype is warranted.

James Graham

CEO and Co-Founder, Community Phone

@wittedhaddock@communityphone

[5G is] definitely not worth the hype for any end-user or individual human. Certain IoT or self-driving car applications are different. Notwithstanding all of the industry claims and promises for how 5G will fix all woes, the one piece that is never considered is how app developers consistently re-write apps to utilize all available bandwidth. So even should all the tenuous bandwidth promises of 5G [be real], app developers — if history is any guide — will stuff themselves with 3rd party frameworks and services that consume your newfound 5G connection. So, while one might be able to theoretically receive twice as much data per second, what matters way more is how your app is developed. Two years ago, websites became the size of DOOM. That’s only increasing.

Jim Poole

Vice President of Business Development, Equinix

The real value of 5G and the reason we’re seeing such heavy investments in building these networks is to help businesses and consumers unlock new, currently unattainable capabilities. 5G networks are expected to far surpass 4G networks in optimizing applications such as IoT, AI, next-generation high definition video and fixed wireless access. 5G’s extremely fast bandwidth and ultra-low latency makes mission-critical control possible, opening the door for new applications that demand absolute reliability, such as health care, energy or autonomous transportations.

Vassilis Seferidis

CEO, Zeetta Networks

@ZeettaNetworks

As a society we tend to over-hype technology. For the person-in-the-street 5G brings you little new functionality compared to a well-designed, uncongested 4G network. It will still let you watch Netflix. What 5G will also do is let you watch Netflix in high-definition, on a crowded train, moving at speed where everyone else on the train is also watching Netflix. Nothing new, but certainly a better experience.

Beyond the day-to-day changes, 5G is a network of networks and has the ability to bridge the digital divide by connecting the unconnected. If all you want to do is watch more box-sets 5G isn’t worth the hype. If you want to make the world a better place 5G may be the technology to help you do it.

Amy Smith

Technology Analyst, FitSmallBusiness.com

@FitSmallBiz

As giddy as I always get for new tech, I also remind myself that first-generation anything should be met with skepticism. The 5G jump promises faster download speeds, lower latency, and all-around better experiences with our smartphones; basically, it’s a bigger pipe for data transfer. However, coverage won’t be widespread initially, and depending on where you are, you might not be able to take full advantage of the network or that expensive new phone. Plus, I’d expect the data caps by wireless services to be prohibitive. The next generation in wireless phone tech is exciting, but I’ll wait a year before I personally invest in anything to make sure the networks are stable (and in my area), the bugs and glitches in new phones (and batteries) are worked out, and that there’s proof that 5G really will be faster than 4G LTE.

Zouhair Sebati

Lead Account Partner, IBM Global Business Services

While attracting a lot of hype about how it will disrupt everything — much like most emerging technologies—5G is different. The predicted transformational benefits are real, but it is still an uncharted landscape. Businesses need to prepare for plenty of first-generation challenges.

A recent report indicates that 60% of organizations surveyed plan to deploy 5G by 2020, with clear expectations for 5G use cases, but this demand is far ahead of what communication service providers (CSPs) can deliver. CSPs are initially focused on consumer broadband services. To businesses, 5G is more than just a better mobile network – it will improve the networks of companies in every industry, allowing them to take greater advantage of transformative technologies, such as AI, IoT, and machine-to-machine communication. From autonomous vehicles to smart cities and healthcare, companies expect 5G to improve how they collect, manage and use data, enabling better customer service, increased operational efficiency, and greater employee productivity. How well an organization plans for and implements 5G will determine the level of transformational impact on its business. This means preparing now to implement this next wave.

Skyler Ditchfield

Co-Founder and CEO, GeoLinks

@GeoLinks_USA | @SkylerJesseD

As it currently stands, 5G is not worth the hype at all. There are still countless issues with the technology, such as your hand or body blocking the signal, and deployment timeframes continue to be pushed further out. In reality, 4G provides us with enough speed and low latency to support all of today’s modern applications. Unless an area is overly saturated, such as urban markets, the general Public will virtually notice no difference between 4G and 5G. Moreover, 5G has a strong potential to hinder progress in connecting rural America. Why? Expansion dollars will likely be focused on building out new 5G infrastructure causing less and less capital being dedicated to closing the 4G gaps in rural and suburban America. I can tell you personally in my town of around 110k (Ventura) there are countless 4G dead spots. In fact, I even run into dead zones throughout Los Angeles and Beverly hills on Verizon. All in all, instead of focusing on the overly-hyped marketing of 5G, our energy and dollars should instead focus on densifying 4G networks and adopting a hybrid-network approach to closing the digital divide.

Chris Nicoll

Principal Analyst Wireless, ACG Research

@CANicoll

Despite promises and early launches by Verizon and T-Mobile in the US, and other operators around the world, the main differing features of 5G – namely very low latency in support of VR-type applications and remote robotic control and ‘network slicing’ to allow networks to be virtually separated into virtual private networks – will not come for at least another 2 to 4 years.

[Furthermore,] the much-touted use of ‘sub-6GHz’ and mmWave spectrum requires 2 to 5x the densification of today’s existing mobile networks. There are some technologies that can mitigate this densification, but as the FCC in the US is pursuing, this requires massive numbers of small cells, and current zoning rules are localized which slows down deployment. This argument also misses the high costs of running fiber to all of these small cells and the only solution is wireless backhaul which requires more spectrum. [So,] 5G will eventually live up to the hype, but for now, consumers should be patient and not fall for the shiny object dangling in front of them.

Michael Bancroft

Co-host, Globalive Media’s “Beyond Innovation”

There’s plenty of hype about incoming 5G networks, and they are definitely worth getting excited about – not only because it will deliver dramatically faster speeds to your smartphone (though that is a nice bonus!), but also because it will unleash the potential of the Internet-of-Things. 5G delivers gigabit speeds at very low latency, making it possible to connect millions of devices simultaneously and constantly, without interruption. Exciting new technologies, such as augmented reality experiences and autonomous vehicles, [will] become possible by laying the 5G groundwork. In the bigger picture, by hooking up IoT sensors to everything from traffic lights, to factory robots, to vending machines, we can gather incredibly granular data on nearly every interaction that occurs, and all of this data can be processed and analyzed by AI algorithms to identify ways to make services vastly more efficient and cost-effective.

However, where the 5G hype gets a little outlandish is in how quickly we’ll see the improved capabilities of 5G come to market. It will take some time to scale these networks and develop the IoT applications that will run on them, and that’s something consumers need to keep in mind.

So as articulated in the above comments, the 5G debate continues with a split verdict. Now, what do you think of 5G, is it worth all the hype?

What are the Best Rural Internet Options?

The Pros and Cons of Different Rural Internet Options

It is reported that more than 24 million Americans don’t have access to broadband Internet. According to a study conducted by Microsoft in 2018, 162.8 million people “do not use the Internet at broadband speeds.” Why? Whether it be due to inflated costs, poor availability, slow deployment, terrestrial restraints, misguided land and airwave regulation, or all the above, communities across the country, predominantly in rural America, lack adequate broadband infrastructure. The inequalities in finances, education, and social status, encountered by those without access to the Internet, versus those who do, has been coined the U.S. Digital Divide.

According to GeoLinks’ Co-Founder and CEO Skyler Ditchfield, there are “Five Crucial Steps Needed To Close The U.S. Digital Divide”. The final, and arguably most imperative item listed, is the need for America to adopt a technology-agnostic hybrid approach. While technologies such as 5G and Fiber were perhaps 2018’s most prominent buzzwords, Fixed Wireless, DSL, Satellite, and Cable, all play an equally vital role in closing the divide.

So, what technologies are available in rural America? Here are the pros and cons of various Rural Internet options:

Pros and Cons of Internet Options

Fixed Wireless Broadband

Fixed wireless provides high-speed broadband Internet access to a single location via radio waves. While capable of servicing both suburban and urban communities, Fixed Wireless Internet is most widely known for its ability to quickly reach and connect rural America.

Pros of Fixed Wireless:

  • Quick to deploy – Fixed Wireless networks can be deployed in a fraction of the time of competing wired technologies.
  • Cost effective – by avoiding costly trenching, fixed wireless networks are far less expensive to build and have a lower impact on the environment.
  • Widely available – because it uses radio waves, fixed wireless networks can reach areas “off the grid”, such as rural America.

Cons of Fixed Wireless:

  • Line of Sight (LOS) – because circuits require direct LOS, trees or large buildings in the connection path can cause signal interference.
  • Bandwidth can be more expensive than DSL, Cable, and some Satellite providers.

dsl-cable geolinks - rural internet

DSL Broadband 

DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) broadband is a wireline technology that transmits data over traditional copper telephone lines already installed to homes and businesses. Because it operates on pre-existing phone lines, when infrastructure is present, DSL can be installed quickly.

Pros of DSL:

  • Accessible – because DSL runs through phone lines, it is more widely available nationwide. (According to broadbandnow.com, DSL has 90% coverage nationwide.)
  • It’s relatively inexpensive – the cost to install and maintain is less than many other broadband technologies, such as Fiber.

Cons of DSL:

  • Slow speeds – DSL speeds are generally between 128 Kbps – 3 Mbps.
  • Inconsistent network quality – because circuit quality relies heavily on the distance from an ISP’s central hub, a major problem for many rural areas, speeds and network reliability are inconsistent.

Satellite Internet Vs. Fixed Wireless - GeoLinks

Satellite Internet

Satellite Internet beams data from your provider to a satellite in space, and then back to a dish at a user’s home or business. Historically, the technology has been primarily used to connect rural areas that don’t have access to wired services.

Pros of Satellite Internet:

  • Expansive availability – because it transmits to a satellite in space, it’s available virtually anywhere on earth.
  • Decent speeds – delivering speeds up to 100 Mbps, Satellite is faster than DSL.

Cons of Satellite Internet:

  • Latency issues – Satellite has inherent latency issues – this is especially problematic with video conferencing and VoIP applications.
  • Unreliable – circuit quality is susceptible to moisture (weather) and objects, such as trees and vegetation.
  • High cost – Satellite Internet is one of the most expensive broadband technologies on the market.

cable geolinks - rural internet

Cable Broadband

Cable Broadband utilizes a modem to provide access to the Internet through the same coaxial cables that deliver pictures and sound to a user’s television set. Mainly used to service residential customers, cable networks are considered shared circuits.

Pros of Cable Broadband:

  • Easy and quick to install – because it uses existing infrastructure, it has the potential to be immediately available.
  • Capacity to be substantially faster than other types of broadband connections such as satellite and DSL.

Cons of Cable Broadband:

  • Unreliable connection – Cable connections are shared with nearby users causing performance issues, such as varying speeds, during peak usage times.
  • Rural limitations – due to the lack of infrastructure extending outside of urban communities, cable is often not available.

  cellular-tower-geolinks - rural internet

Cellular Mobile Broadband

Mobile broadband delivers Internet over a mobile network – the same networks utilized by your smartphone. Mobile broadband can be accessed via portable wireless hotspots and wireless modems from anywhere that has a cellular connection.

Pros of Mobile Broadband:

  • Easy access – assuming there is reception in the area, it has the potential to be immediately available.
  • Quick and easy install – the ‘plug and play feature’ of this technology eliminates the need for physical cables, phone lines, or an electricity source.

Cons of Mobile Broadband:

  • Inconsistent coverage – If you live in a remote area, you may not get cellular reception, preventing access altogether.
  • Unreliable performance – Average mobiles speeds fall around 3 Mbps and fluctuate depending on location and the number of people connected to the network.
  • Capped data usage – To prevent network saturation, mobile broadband plans typically come with a data cap– go over and bills can get quite expensive.

flexible fiberoptic - geolinks

Fiber Broadband

Fiber broadband provides Internet access by converting electrical signals carrying data to light and sends the light through transparent glass fibers. It is one of, if not the most requested broadband technology on the market.

Pros of Fiber Broadband:

  • Speed – Fiber is capable of delivering multi-gig speeds making it one of the fastest broadband options on the market alongside fixed wireless.
  • Scalable and flexible bandwidth – once installed, bandwidth can be increased or decreased almost on-demand.

Cons of Fiber Broadband:

  • Not available everywhere – Fiber is currently available in only 25% of the country.
  • Expensive and slow to deploy – fiber optic cable is extremely costly to deploy and requires trenching (which is often stalled by lengthy permitting processes.)

While there are advantages and disadvantages to each Rural Internet option, when used together, these technologies can create a ubiquitous solution capable of delivering multi-gigabit bandwidth to all communities across the country. If the U.S. can collectively adapt to building out technology-agnostic hybrid networks, we can one day close the digital divide.

Want to see if GeoLinks’ Rural Internet Option, ClearFiber™, is available in your community?

 

 

 

GeoLinks Named One of the “Best Entrepreneurial Companies in America” by Entrepreneur Magazine’s Entrepreneur 360™ List

GeoLinks Named One of the “Best Entrepreneurial Companies in America” by Entrepreneur Magazine’s Entrepreneur 360™ List

Press Release distributed on Businesswire.com 

Dec. 19, 2018 – Camarillo, California – GeoLinks has been recognized as one of the “Best Entrepreneurial Companies in America” by Entrepreneur magazine’s Entrepreneur 360™ List, a premier study delivering the most comprehensive analysis of private companies in America. Based on this study forged by Entrepreneur, GeoLinks is recognized as a well-rounded company that has mastered a balance of impact, innovation, growth leadership, and value.

GeoLinks, an award-winning telecommunications company, was founded with a mission to close the U.S. Digital Divide. Nationally recognized for its innovative Internet and Digital Voice solutions, GeoLinks’ flagship product, ClearFiber™, delivers cost effective symmetrical Internet access to anchor institutions and businesses across the state of California and beyond. Created by GeoLinks Co-Founders Skyler Ditchfield and Ryan Hauf, ClearFiber™ is a hybrid fixed wireless network that utilizes renewable energy to generate telecom-grade broadband. By building state-of-the-art solar and wind powered telecommunications facilities, GeoLinks is able to build off the grid in a fraction of the time and at a fraction of the cost of fiber. With typical permitting and infrastructure boundaries eliminated, ClearFiber™ is an innovative, green, and economical way to connect both urban markets and rural communities alike.

“Our annual evaluation of vetted data offers a 360-degree analysis of top privately-held companies across a multitude of industries,” explains Jason Feifer, editor in chief of Entrepreneur Magazine. “They are deemed successful not only by revenue numbers, but by how well-rounded they are. The companies that make the list have pushed boundaries with their innovative ideas, fostered strong company cultures, impacted their communities for the better, and increased their brand awareness.”

“I speak on behalf of the entire GeoLinks’ team when I say we are thrilled to be recognized on such an esteemed list,” said GeoLinks’ Co-Founder and CEO Skyler Ditchfield. “From helping to close the U.S. digital divide, to deploying wildfire detection, prevention, and situational awareness systems, to offering pro-bono circuits to Red Cross shelters during times of disaster, to creating an exceptional company culture ,  everything GeoLinks sets out to do is ultimately aimed at making both our community and the world a better place. Yes, we are a business, so we must earn capital, but the way I see it, the more we grow, the more resources we have to help and give back. I am humbled and honored that Entrepreneur recognizes GeoLinks as a well-rounded, innovative company that truly is making an impact.”

Honorees were identified based on the results from a comprehensive study of independently owned companies, using a proprietary algorithm and other advanced analytics. The algorithm was built on a balanced scorecard designed to measure five metrics reflecting major pillars of entrepreneurship—innovation, growth, leadership, impact, and business valuation.

To learn more about GeoLinks, visit GeoLinks.com

For additional details on the E360 List and the companies recognized, visit: entrepreneur.com/360

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About GeoLinks

Headquartered in Southern California, GeoLinks is a leading telecommunications company and competitive local exchange carrier (CLEC) public utility, nationally recognized for its innovative Internet and Digital Voice solutions. Ranked first in category on Inc. Magazine’s Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing Companies in America in both 2017 and 2018, GeoLinks delivers Enterprise-Grade Internet, Digital Voice, SD-WANCloud On-ramping, Layer 2 Transport, and both Public and Private Turnkey Network Construction expertly tailored for businesses and Anchor Institutions nationwide.

Recognized as a thought-leader in closing the digital divide, GeoLinks proudly sits on an array of national boards, coalitions, and working groups including the Schools, Healthcare & Libraries Broadband (SHLB) Coalition’s Board of Directors, the Wireless Internet Service Providers Association (WISPA), the Broadband Consortium of the Pacific Coast (BCPC), and the FCC’s Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee’s (BDAC) Streamlining Federal Siting Working Group, and Disaster Response and Recovery Working Group.

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The future has arrived; it’s Smart, and we’re not ready for it. Here’s why.

Smart City Technology- Lexie Smith - GeoLinks

Read the original article on Medium.com

From Washington D.C., to the coast of California, “Smart City” is, and was, perhaps 2018’s most prominent buzzword, aside from “5G”, circulating nearly all tech, economic, and broadband related conferences and forums. While the exact definition of what really is a “Smart City” varies by person and party, the concept itself is based on the integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and the Internet of things or (IoT), to optimize city-wide operations, services, and ultimately connect to citizens.

While some of the general public still think of this concept as far off, the reality is that “Smart Cities” have already began materializing across the country. Thus, this glorified digital future is here, and guess what America, we’re not ready.

Why Not?

Well, it’s simple really. Cities and its citizens can have all the ICT or IoT devices they want, but in order to make a city smart, these systems and gadgets have to physically work. That’s where connectivity comes into play. To fuel a Smart City, you need to have broadband Internet access with enough bandwidth to support electronic data collection and transfers. According to the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) 2018 Broadband Deployment Report, upwards of 24 million Americans still lack access to high speed broadband. Furthermore, the report states that approximately 14 million rural Americans and 1.2 million Americans living on Tribal lands still lack mobile LTE broadband at speeds of 10 Mbps/3 Mbps. Finally, only 88% of American schools were reported to meet the FCC’s short-term connectivity goal of 100 Mbps per 1,000 users, and only 22% of school districts met its long-term connectivity goal of 1 Gbps per 1,000 users.

On December 4th, the New York Times released an article titled, “Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says” that refuted the FCC’s published report. Based on a study conducted by Microsoft, the article summarizes that researchers concluded “162.8 million people do not use the internet at broadband speeds… In Ferry County, for example, Microsoft estimates that only 2 percent of people use broadband service, versus the 100 percent the federal government says have access to the service.”

So, regardless of which multi-million statistic we conclude is more legitimate, while many metro areas may have the bandwidth needed to at least partially move forward into the next digital revolution, there are still millions of Americans who would, as it stands, be left behind. This reality, coined the digital divide, is the ultimate Smart City roadblock.

Why being hyper fiber-minded is our fatal flaw:

States and communities across the country advocate that pervasive fiber network expansion is the solution to closing the divide. And yes, fiber networks can be great. The reality is, however, that building out fiber infrastructure to every location in America is time-consuming, tedious, and prohibitively expensive. Therefore, deploying fiber does not make economic sense in many rural and urban areas of the country. The Google Fiber project serves as a prime example of this.

To summarize, Google officially launched its Google Fiber project in 2010 with more than 1,100 cities applying to be the “First Fiber City.” By 2011, Google announced it selected Kansas City, Kansas as its target pilot. Fast-forward to 2014, and Google missed its projected city-wide connection deadline in Kansas claiming delays. By 2016, Google publicly commented that all-fiber build outs are proving infeasible due to costs and varying restrictive topologies, consequently filing with the FCC to begin testing wireless broadband internet in 24 cities. Within a few months, they officially acquired a wireless broadband provider and formally announced fixed wireless as part of their Google Fiber network moving forward.

All in all, this case study demonstrates first-hand that to actually close the U.S. digital divide our country must adapt a technology-agnostic mind-set and implement a hybrid-network approach that utilizes whatever technology or technologies makes the most sense for a particular region. Technologies like Fixed Wireless, TV Whitespace, 4G, and Fixed 5G, all have their place, alongside Fiber, in closing the divide. Unfortunately, until those in positions of influence are able to open their minds to these alternative methods, America will remain unconnected.

Who are people in positions of influence?

Luckily, our current FCC administration seems at least semi-understanding that fiber isn’t a “one-size fits all solution”; demonstrated in the recent distribution of funding to WISPs in the CAF II Auction. However, many state and local governments remain less progressive. At a recent California Emerging Technology Fund (CETF) meeting in Sacramento, for example, a large majority of key broadband stakeholders and municipalities advocated that the California Department of Transportation’s (CALTRANS) future infrastructure plans should be wholly fiber-based to support the future of Smart Cities and Autonomous Cars. Whether it be from a lack of education, poor past experiences, or simply riding the buzzword bandwagon, until government organizations can push past common misconceptions that fiber is the only answer, community businesses and residents will be left in the divide.

So, what’s the “Smart” thing to do now?

For those cities in America already connected with reliable multi-gig Internet, go ahead, smart things up! Just keep in mind, to remain a Smart City, even fiber-rich metros will eventually need to extend current network infrastructure to new end points such as light poles, unconnected buildings, and future city expansions.

Ultimately, if we want to collectively prepare for this new revolution, we need to first focus on closing the digital divide. First comes broadband, then comes innovation, then comes the utopian idea of not only Smart Cities, but a smart country.

Smart City - Lexie Smith - GeoLinks

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