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What Does a Fixed Wireless Business Internet Installation Look Like?

Fixed Wireless Internet Installations for Business – What to Expect
October 27th, 2020 [UPDATED]
Originally Published on January 15th, 2019

Fixed Wireless Business Internet Installations – What to Expect

Fixed Wireless Internet providers deliver high-speed broadband access to a single location via radio waves. Capable of delivering gigabit speeds with identical jitter and latency to fiber, Fixed Wireless Internet circuits can be installed at your business in a fraction of the time, and for a fraction of the cost, of competing technologies. Want to learn more about Fixed Wireless Internet? Check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8GvGOKCpnk

How Does Fixed Wireless Internet Work?

Fixed wireless Internet uses a dish antenna that is affixed to the roof of your company’s building and connected to your server room or router through a cable, and beams an Internet signal into your location through radio waves from the nearest tower.

how does fixed wireless internet work diagram

How Does Fixed Wireless Internet Installation Compare to Other Types of Internet?

The table below outlines how fixed wireless Internet compares to fiber, cable, DSL and satellite Internet connections:

Fixed Wireless Business Internet Installation Comparison Chart

So, what does a Fixed Wireless Business Internet installation look like?

 

Prior to Circuit Installation

In order to deliver high-speed Internet access, a Fixed Wireless Internet service provider must first confirm a client’s business location has an express line of sight (LOS) to a nearby Base Station (telecom tower). While different wireless business Internet providers may administer varying methods to confirm LOS, most Wireless Internet Service Providers (WISPs) encounter situations where a site visit is sometimes needed to confirm serviceability. Typically, a roof access form (RAF) is required from the building owner or property management company prior to conducting a site visit. Assuming access is granted, on-site techs can then confirm LOS and test signal strength from the intended installation point.

Not sure how much bandwidth your business needs? Check out our simple guide by clicking here. 

Installing Fixed Wireless Internet Circuits

Every WISP has its own unique installation process and preferred equipment. For the purpose of this post, we will specifically examine GeoLinks’ ClearFiber™ Fixed Wireless Internet installations. Fully insured with coverage that meets property management and owner requirements, all GeoLinks’ installations are managed by our team of experienced technicians that consider visual aesthetics and building and city code compliance.

Fixed Wireless Internet Installation Equipment

GeoLinks Installation Equipment

Subscriber – When installing a ClearFiber™ circuit, a “Subscriber” unit, also referred to as Customer Premise Equipment (CPE), is placed on the roof of the client’s building. While Subscribers can vary based on the service ordered and location of the customer premises, the average GeoLinks’ Subscriber dimensions measure 24 – 36 inches in diameter and weigh between 5 – 20lbs. The Subscriber is responsible for transmitting the wireless signal from the Base Station to the customer premise, and vice versa.

Non-Penetrating Roof Mount – The Subscriber is mounted directly to a non-penetrating roof mount. This is a 36in self-supporting, square angle steel frame with a 60in x 2in diameter mast designed specifically for antenna installation. It does not damage or require any mounting to the roof.

Rubber Mat and Blocks – Included as part of GeoLinks’ installation is an outdoor anti-skid rubber mat, placed directly under the non-penetrating roof mount. This outdoor weatherized mat is used to protect the roof and measures 36in x 36in x 1/8in. Depending upon Subscriber height, 6in x 8in x 16in concrete blocks are placed evenly around the base to stabilize the roof mount. The average install requires 6 to 8 bricks, with each brick weighing about 30lbs.

Cable – Once the Subscriber is installed and secured, an exterior outdoor rated Cat5e cable is run through a pre-existing vent or access point of the roof directly to the customer’s network room. This cable is plugged into a Power Over Ethernet (PoE) power supply that powers the subscriber and delivers service to the customer.

How Long Does it Take to Get Installed?

Just like most business services, fixed wireless Internet installation periods vary from provider to provider. GeoLinks prides itself on having one of the industry’s shortest installation periods. Our expertly trained technicians can connect businesses in as little as 24 hours. For larger circuits, we average between 7 to 10 business days.

Why Should Your Business Install Fixed Wireless at Your Location?

When your company chooses GeoLinks’ ClearFiber™ Fixed Wireless Internet, you benefit from:

  • True Network Redundancy
  • Unlimited Bandwidth
  • Guaranteed Speeds up to 10Gbps
  • 24/7 U.S-Based Customer Support & IT Expert Access
  • 99.9999% Uptime Guarantee backed by an Industry-Leading SLA

It doesn’t matter your size, whether you’re a single-location small business or multi-location enterprise corporation looking for a reliable fixed wireless Internet connection, we’ve got you covered.

Plus, GeoLinks isn’t just an Internet connectivity provider. We offer over-the-top Hosted Voice communications solutions and IP phones to keep your business always communicating.

Questions About Fixed Wireless Installations?

GeoLinks in-house Client Consultants are available to assist with any questions you may have regarding your business installation or service. To speak to a GeoLinks’ Client Consultant call (888) 225-1571 option 2.

Ready to Try ClearFiber™ Fixed Wireless Internet?

Contact a GeoLinks Internet Specialist Today

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The future has arrived; it’s Smart, and we’re not ready for it. Here’s why.

Smart City Technology- Lexie Smith - GeoLinks

Read the original article on Medium.com

From Washington D.C., to the coast of California, “Smart City” is, and was, perhaps 2018’s most prominent buzzword, aside from “5G”, circulating nearly all tech, economic, and broadband related conferences and forums. While the exact definition of what really is a “Smart City” varies by person and party, the concept itself is based on the integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and the Internet of things or (IoT), to optimize city-wide operations, services, and ultimately connect to citizens.

While some of the general public still think of this concept as far off, the reality is that “Smart Cities” have already began materializing across the country. Thus, this glorified digital future is here, and guess what America, we’re not ready.

Why Not?

Well, it’s simple really. Cities and its citizens can have all the ICT or IoT devices they want, but in order to make a city smart, these systems and gadgets have to physically work. That’s where connectivity comes into play. To fuel a Smart City, you need to have broadband Internet access with enough bandwidth to support electronic data collection and transfers. According to the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) 2018 Broadband Deployment Report, upwards of 24 million Americans still lack access to high speed broadband. Furthermore, the report states that approximately 14 million rural Americans and 1.2 million Americans living on Tribal lands still lack mobile LTE broadband at speeds of 10 Mbps/3 Mbps. Finally, only 88% of American schools were reported to meet the FCC’s short-term connectivity goal of 100 Mbps per 1,000 users, and only 22% of school districts met its long-term connectivity goal of 1 Gbps per 1,000 users.

On December 4th, the New York Times released an article titled, “Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says” that refuted the FCC’s published report. Based on a study conducted by Microsoft, the article summarizes that researchers concluded “162.8 million people do not use the internet at broadband speeds… In Ferry County, for example, Microsoft estimates that only 2 percent of people use broadband service, versus the 100 percent the federal government says have access to the service.”

So, regardless of which multi-million statistic we conclude is more legitimate, while many metro areas may have the bandwidth needed to at least partially move forward into the next digital revolution, there are still millions of Americans who would, as it stands, be left behind. This reality, coined the digital divide, is the ultimate Smart City roadblock.

Why being hyper fiber-minded is our fatal flaw:

States and communities across the country advocate that pervasive fiber network expansion is the solution to closing the divide. And yes, fiber networks can be great. The reality is, however, that building out fiber infrastructure to every location in America is time-consuming, tedious, and prohibitively expensive. Therefore, deploying fiber does not make economic sense in many rural and urban areas of the country. The Google Fiber project serves as a prime example of this.

To summarize, Google officially launched its Google Fiber project in 2010 with more than 1,100 cities applying to be the “First Fiber City.” By 2011, Google announced it selected Kansas City, Kansas as its target pilot. Fast-forward to 2014, and Google missed its projected city-wide connection deadline in Kansas claiming delays. By 2016, Google publicly commented that all-fiber build outs are proving infeasible due to costs and varying restrictive topologies, consequently filing with the FCC to begin testing wireless broadband internet in 24 cities. Within a few months, they officially acquired a wireless broadband provider and formally announced fixed wireless as part of their Google Fiber network moving forward.

All in all, this case study demonstrates first-hand that to actually close the U.S. digital divide our country must adapt a technology-agnostic mind-set and implement a hybrid-network approach that utilizes whatever technology or technologies makes the most sense for a particular region. Technologies like Fixed Wireless, TV Whitespace, 4G, and Fixed 5G, all have their place, alongside Fiber, in closing the divide. Unfortunately, until those in positions of influence are able to open their minds to these alternative methods, America will remain unconnected.

Who are people in positions of influence?

Luckily, our current FCC administration seems at least semi-understanding that fiber isn’t a “one-size fits all solution”; demonstrated in the recent distribution of funding to WISPs in the CAF II Auction. However, many state and local governments remain less progressive. At a recent California Emerging Technology Fund (CETF) meeting in Sacramento, for example, a large majority of key broadband stakeholders and municipalities advocated that the California Department of Transportation’s (CALTRANS) future infrastructure plans should be wholly fiber-based to support the future of Smart Cities and Autonomous Cars. Whether it be from a lack of education, poor past experiences, or simply riding the buzzword bandwagon, until government organizations can push past common misconceptions that fiber is the only answer, community businesses and residents will be left in the divide.

So, what’s the “Smart” thing to do now?

For those cities in America already connected with reliable multi-gig Internet, go ahead, smart things up! Just keep in mind, to remain a Smart City, even fiber-rich metros will eventually need to extend current network infrastructure to new end points such as light poles, unconnected buildings, and future city expansions.

Ultimately, if we want to collectively prepare for this new revolution, we need to first focus on closing the digital divide. First comes broadband, then comes innovation, then comes the utopian idea of not only Smart Cities, but a smart country.

Smart City - Lexie Smith - GeoLinks

Related Suggested Articles:

Five Crucial Steps Needed To Close The U.S. Digital Divide

Grow Food, Grow Jobs: How Broadband Can Boost Farming in California’s Central Valley

Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says

How Community Anchor Institutions Can Help Close the Digital Divide

Rural service is key to bridging the digital divide